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An inorganic compound is a chemical compound that is not an organic compound.

There is no clear or universally agreed-upon distinction between organic and inorganic compounds, but common definitions focus on the presence or absence of carbon (or certain kinds of carbon bonds) or the source from which the compound is derived.

Opal is another mineraloid because of its non-crystalline nature. ] to be a mineral because of the presence of calcium carbonate crystals within its structure, would be better considered a mineraloid because the crystals are bonded by an organic material, and there is no definite proportion of the components.

Amber is fossilized tree resin, which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic times.[2] Much valued from antiquity to the present as a gemstone, amber is made into a variety of decorative objects.[3] Amber is used as an ingredient in perfumes, as a healing agent in folk medicine, and as jewelry.

The ancient Italic peoples of southern Italy were working amber, the most important examples are on display at the National Archaeological Museum of Siritide to Matera.

Amber used in antiquity as at Mycenae and in the prehistory of the Mediterranean comes from deposits of Sicily.

Because it originates as a soft, sticky tree resin, amber sometimes contains animal and plant material as inclusions.[4] Amber occurring in coal seams is also called resinite, and the term ambrite is applied to that found specifically within New Zealand coal seams Earlier[13] Pliny says that a large island of three days' sail from the Scythian coast called Balcia by Xenophon of Lampsacus, author of a fanciful travel book in Greek, is called Basilia by Pytheas.Inorganic compounds are traditionally viewed as being synthesized by the agency of geological systems.In contrast, organic compounds are found in biological systems.Some simple compounds which contain carbon are usually considered inorganic.

These include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, cyanides, cyanates, carbides, and thiocyanates.The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, an agency widely recognized for defining chemical terms, does not offer definitions of inorganic or organic compounds.